The increased popularity of high-pressure inflatables – and the increased pressure needed for inflatable paddle boards – has launched a quest for easy inflation. Almost daily, we field calls from people who want easier and quicker pump options, so they can spend less time on the beach, and more on the water.

A while ago, we published our popular Guide to High Pressure Inflatable Pumps. Since then, more options have become available.

AquaGLide Turbo HP Pump

Recently we received our first shipment of Aquaglide’s 12-Volt 2-Stage Turbo HP Pumps, which bills itself as capable of inflating from 1 to 20 PSI. The Turbo HP is a fairly diminutive size, measuring 12 x 5 x 6 inches and weighing in at 3 lbs 5 oz. The pump includes a 4 foot long, rugged, non-kink hose with two adaptors – an HR-style military adaptor and a screw-on adaptor.

As most of our inflatable kayaks run 1 to 6 PSI, and our inflatable paddle boards run 12 to 18 PSI, this seemed a good option. Best of all, it works off a car power point-cigarette lighter, but also includes alligator clips for direct connection to car or boat battery.

Using the AquaGlide 12V Turbo HP Pump

As our previous tests were done with a Red Paddle 18-PSI Surfer 10’0″, we opted for a Red Paddle Ride 9-8 which we had in our boat building – a pretty similar size and volume of 196 liters.

AquaGlide 12V Turbo HP Electric Pump

Instructions are pretty basic. First, connect the HR-adaptor to the hose end, and screw the hose onto the pump. Initially, it was tough to couple as the o-ring material is stiff. We pushed hard and were able to make the connection. Turn on the car battery (not the motor) and plug the connector into the car power point. Dial in the desired PSI – in this case we opted for 18 PSI, and hit the on button.

The initial (first) stage was fairly quiet. By one minute, the board was totally unfurled, then it jumped to Turbo mode (2nd stage) and became louder. We timed the inflation. At 3 minutes the board was at 5 PSI, 4 minutes to 7 PSI, 6 minutes to 11 PSI, 8 minutes to 14 PSI, 9 minutes to 15 PSI. At 10 minutes, 29 seconds, the motor shut off after reaching 18 PSI.

Timing the inflation

We tried to carefully twist off the hose, and it nearly blew us off. We managed to re-make the connection, and re-pumped it to 15 PSI. Through trial and error, we found that slowly twisting off the hose would lose air. If we quickly pulled off the hose – by pushing/twisting and popping off – it came off easily. So practice a little first. We did use a K-Pump quick check valve. We inflated the board to 11 PSI, lost a little air twisting it off, and read 10 PSI with the Kwik-Chek – so running fairly close.

We re-read our initial review on the Ride 9-8, and found it took us just over 200 pumps and roughly 5 minutes to manually reach 15 PSI with a hand pump.  All-in-all, not bad!

HR and Boston valve adaptors

The military valve adaptor couples with Halkey-Roberts valves, which are utilized by many board and kayak manufacturers. This will fit on Red Paddle Boards, C4-Waterman, Mistral, JP Australia, Advanced Elements boards, Airis and of course, AquaGlide. Since the end of the hose uses a pin system, you can use other proprietary adaptors, as long as your fitting will slip onto the pump hose end. Innova kayaks come with an adaptor that friction fits onto a Boston valve adaptor. This comes standard on many of the hand/foot pumps. As long as you can attach the Boston valve (BV) adaptor to the hose end with the pin/slot system, you can use any adaptor that friction fits onto a BV adaptor.

The screw-on adaptor is also pretty nifty. It works with all the Advanced Elements screw-on military valves, as well as the AquaGlide kayaks utilizing Boston valves – by opening the top cap, the adaptor screws onto the Boston valve base.

Attachment for direct battery contact

For those without power points, or who wish to use a marine battery, the pump comes with a fitting that slides over the power point connector. The other end has alligator clips for connecting directly to a battery.

The instructions state that the pump should not be used for more than 20 minutes continuously with a rest period of 10 minutes inbetween for cool-down.

We decided to give the AquaGlide Turbo HP the acid test.

This past week, we received our first shipment of AquaGlide’s new Blackfoot Angler Tandem – a near 15-foot behemoth with 36+ inches of width, a 6-inch thickness and nearly 300 liters.. We had manually pumped up the prototype version last year – and to only 10 PSI – and were not looking forward to the workout as the current temperature was in the 90’s F.

As the Blackfoot Angler Tandem is rated at 15 PSI, we dialed in the pump, plugged in the cord and let her rip. Then we sat down in the shade.

By 2 minutes 37 seconds, the  2nd stage kicked in. At 6.5 minutes we were at 5 PSI, at 9 minutes it had climbed to 7.5 PSI. At 12.5 minutes we were at 10 PSI, 14 minutes to 12 PSI, 17 minutes to 13.5 PSI. At 19 minutes and 25 seconds, the motor shut off – it had reached 15 PSI. We did hear some leakage from the pump/hose side of the connection (possibly it had loosened up a little) but the adaptor came off easily.

Bottom line on the AquaGlide 12V Electric Turbo HP pump:

This is now my “when I’m in a hurry or feeling lazy” go-to pump. It’s simple, pretty lightweight and has a fairly small footprint. Additionally, it is MUCH simpler to plug into a cigarette lighter/power point, than connecting directly to the car battery. And it’s slightly less noisy. This is a great option – particularly for those with both inflatable kayaks and boards – who need to reach a wide range of pressures (1 to 20 PSI) and who want it to be easy and fairly quick. It’s also a great choice for paddlers who may have physical disabilities and are unable to manually pump for long periods of time. And at a street value of $139, it is less expensive – and more reliable – than some other 12V pumps on the market.

To see more info or to purchase, visit the AquaGlide 12V 2-Stage Turbo HP pump product page on our website at AirKayaks.com.

Posted by: airkayaks | May 17, 2017

Sale! 20% Off AquaGlide Kayaks, Paddle Boards & Gear

AquaGlide’s Super Summer 20% Off Sale starts May 18th.

AquaGlide Chelan HB Tandem XL Inflatable Kayak paddled solo

Get 20% off all in-stock AquaGlide inflatable kayaks, paddle boards and gear during the Super Summer Sale from May 18th through June 1st.

Blackfoot Angler SUP on the water

Shop early for the best selection, with kayaks priced at $183.95 to $879.95 and paddle boards as low as $559. 95. No tax and free US shipping via UPS ground on orders over $398.

AquaGlide Panther inflatable kayak

Visit the AquaGlide product pages at www.AirKayaks.com for details or to purchase.

 

Posted by: airkayaks | May 17, 2017

Save 20% During the AquaGlide Super Summer Sale

AquaGlide’s 2017 Super Summer 20% Off Sale starts May 18th.

AquaGlide Chelan HB Tandem XL Inflatable Kayak paddled solo

Get 20% off all in-stock AquaGlide inflatable kayaks, paddle boards and gear during the Super Summer Sale from May 18th through June 1st.

Blackfoot Angler SUP on the water

Shop early for the best selection, with kayaks priced at $183.95 to $879.95 and paddle boards as low as $559. 95. No tax and free US shipping via UPS ground on orders over $398.

AquaGlide Panther inflatable kayak

Visit the AquaGlide product pages at www.AirKayaks.com for details or to purchase.

We recently reviewed two of the new Innova inflatable kayaks – the Solar 410C and the Seawave – which are both billed as kayaks for one to three paddlers.

Innova Inflatable Kayaks: Seawave vs Solar 410C

Innova kayaks are manufactured in the Czech Republic under the Gumotex label. The Innova kayaks are well-known for their portability and PVC-free construction, making them a great choice for back-country trekking, plane flights, and environmentally-conscious paddlers. In the photo above,  the Solar kayak is green (but also available in red), while the Seawave is red.

One of the most commonly asked questions is – which one is right for me? Below we have compiled a list of similarities and differences to help guide you in making that personal decision.

What’s the same in both kayaks?

Both kayaks are constructed from the same 1200 denier, rubber-coated laminate Nitrylon hull material. Both main chambers can be inflated to 3-PSI, and the smaller chambers to 1-1.5 PSI. Each has the same-style carrying bag, molded rubber handles, removable tracking fin, 3 main military valve chambers and four smaller twistlock chambers. They also have the same rear foot brace, seat attachments, seat straps and loop attachments.

Each comes with two seats, two braces, instructions, adaptor, repair kit and sponge. Each has the option to paddle double, solo, or add an optional third seat for a small child.

So what’s different?

 

Innova Inflatable Kayaks: Seawave vs Solar 410C
While there are many items that are similar, the Innova Solar 410C (green in photo above) is a simpler, recreational kayak suitable for calmer waters. The Solar features shorter front and rear splash decks with a short length of rope line. There are four sets of tube d-rings for attaching seats and gear, five sets of floor loops/straps with four plastic d-rings, for attaching gear and braces. An integrated “numbering system” on the floor guides solo paddlers where to place the foor brace, based on their height. The front foot brace features a “double hump” system, and the seat back is two inches higher. A rear netting system with 4 clips expands the gear storage options.

At 163 inches long and 32 inches wide, the Solar 410C is shorter; the interior space of 160 in length and 14-15 inches wide is also shorter. There are no options for attaching decks or a rudder system. There is no blow hole. The weight is lighter at 38 lbs for the pack and contents. The carrying capacity is slightly higher at 591 lbs while the MSRP is lower at $749.

Innova Inflatable Kayaks: Seawave vs Solar 410C
The Innova Seawave (red in photo above) has been set up with numerous optional enhancements, making it a better touring choice. The Seawave has longer front and rear splash decks, with rope line running the perimeter of the  kayak. Integrated numbering systems on the side hull guide the paddler with seat and rib placment. There are six sets of d-rings, and 5 sets of corded loops, which can be used for attaching seats and gear. The bow is sculpted, allowing it to slice through the water.  There is no integrated netting system and the seat backs are 2 inches lower.

Innova Seawve with double deck and three seating positions

One of the major differences is the ability to add optional gear – such as double and single decks and a rudder system – which really expand the usage possibilities. The outer kayak is longer and slightly narrower at 15 feet in length and 31 inches wide, and weighs more at 44 lbs in the pack. The carrying capacity is slightly lower at 550 lbs while the MSRP is higher at $999.

Bottom line:

Innova Solar 410C paddled solo
If you plan on milder kayaking activities (calm waters such as lakes, slow rivers, inland waters), prefer the ease of a lighter-weight kayak for hauling around, or are on a tighter budget, the Solar 410C will be a great choice. It’s pretty snappy, and paddles well – in short, it’s a fun, calm-water vessel. It’s a great choice for those who don’t need all the “whizbangs.” The integrated storage netting is a plus for carrying gear. And it is 25% less expensive.

Innova Seawave

If you can afford the extra money, need more flexibility in paddling conditions and weight is not an issue, go for the Seawave. It’s a great kayak, great performer and is versatile enough to use year-round in mild whitewater, lakes, coastal routes and bays – where the ability to use optional single and double decks, spray skirts as well as a rudder system might be a plus. Its added weight makes tracking a bit better. The extra decking keeps some water out and rigging allows paddlers to carry more gear.

Need more info? Both updated product reviews can be seen here:

Product Review: Innova Solar 410C Inflatable Kayak for 1 to 3 paddlers
Product Review: New Innova Seawave Inflatable Touring Kayak for 1-3 paddlers

Or if you wish to purchase one, see the Innova Solar 410C product page or Innova Seawave product page at www.AirKayaks.com.

This past week we had the opportunity to take our first look at the Innova Seawave inflatable kayak – a two+ person kayak with a versatile design that allows one to attach optional spray decks, spray skirts and a foot rudder system.

The Innova line is unique for a number of reasons. First, all the kayaks are handmade in the Czech Republic; the factory has manufactured inflatable boats for well over 50 years. In Europe, a similar line is marketed under the name Gumotex.

We previously published our review on the new Solar 410C, Innova’s other 2+ person inflatable introduced into the US market simultaneously. So here is our write-up on the the Innova Seawave inflatable tandem kayak, which weighs 44 lbs in the pack, is 15 feet in length with a payload of 551 lbs for two+ persons and gear. (Please note: some of the information will be duplicated from other Innova reviews).

Getting Started with the Innova Seawave

The box as received weighs in at 48 lbs, measuring 27 x 18.5 x 12.5 inches.

Inside is a very nifty 100L backpack with adjustable shoulder straps, front pouch pocket and roll top closure. This contains the kayak body, tracking fin, foot rests, repair kit, instructions, cinch belt, valve adaptor, seats and sponge. Packed dimensions are 24 x 17 x 12 inches as received in the bag, with a weight of 44 lbs. The kayak with seats and foot rests is 41 lbs. (Please note: This is the actual kayak weight, NOT the 29 lbs as stated from the manufacturer’s literature.)

Innova Seawave Kayak Setup/Inflatation

We read through the included instruction manuals. Just like all the other Innova  products, the Innova Seawave manual is surprisingly detailed in some aspects, while lacking in others. As the kayaks are made in Europe, many of the details are based around European specs and regulations and can sound more complicated than it actually is. Additionally, some of the translations are a bit difficult to understand.

Unfolding the kayak

First step, unpack and unfold the kayak body. What is immediately noticeable is how FLAT the kayak is when deflated – of course, this makes it quite compact for travel.

Removable tracking fin

Next, flip the kayak over to install the tracking fin before inflation, locating the fin “shoe” towards the stern. Slip the end with the larger slot in first, making sure that the fin is pointing towards the “back” of the kayak. This enables it to slide in enough to fit in the second side.

With attached foot braces and seats

The instructions suggest attaching and inflating the foot braces and seats first, though these actually come pre-attached from the factory. (If they are not attached, start with the foot braces. There are five buckles on the floor – when paddling tandem, use the 1st and 3rd floor buckles).

We then turned to the seats, which once again were already attached. But at this point it started getting confusing.

Both sides of the kayak have a complex series of d-rings and webbed loops; these are identified by two separate rows of numbers. The instructions mention some of these, but the definitions are sometimes hard to understand. There are three ways to set up the kayak – with one seat, two seats or an optional third seat. The seating positions are printed onto the side of the kayak with <1>, <2> or <3> so that one knows where to position the seats for each of those conditions. But …. there are two rows of numbers, in different locations – and on top of each other. After quite a bit of reading (and some pre-hand knowledge of the product) we figured it out.

Side cord/loop system

The bottom row of numbers is located under the d-rings – this shows where to put the seat based on the number of seats in the kayak. The upper row of numbers are associated with the webbed loops.

Optional single deck with metal risers

The webbed loops are use in conjunction with the optional spray decks, which use metal bar deck risers to sculpt the body and give some structural rigidity (this is shown above). These “upper” numbers identify where to put each bar – this is not fully explained in the instructions. So, if you do not plan on using the decks, ignore the upper numbers.

With this in mind, we set up the kayak for tandem paddling. We placed each seat by the lower “2’s”, placing the mid-center of the seat base just under the lower 2. This puts the seats in approximately the correct paddling positions (they can be varied somewhat). Following this through, if you planned on paddling solo, position the one seat with the mid-center of the seat base just under the lower “1”.

We now pumped up the braces and seats.

Inflating the foot brace

The foot braces and seats utilize a twistlock valve, which performs as it sounds – twist the end to open or close the valve. The Boston valves will not friction fit over the twistlok so you will have to do one of three things – have another paddler hold the valve over the twistlock; carefully negotiate holding the adaptor and twistlock together with one hand while pumping with the other; or give up and blow it up with your mouth. It took about 1 to 2 puffs to get each foot brace filled out.

Inflating the seat

The seats took about 5-6 puffs or pumps each, to reach 1 to 1.5 PSI (the pressure is not mentioned in the instruction manual). AirKayaks note: Here is a nifty little home-made adaptor that works with these twistlocks.

We then turned to pumping up the main chambers.

Closing and opening the valve.

The Innova Seawave features three main inflation chambers utilizing military valves – one for the floor and one for each side. The military-style plunger valve is simple to use – with your finger, twist the plunger slightly to the “up” position to inflate (air goes in but doesn’t come back out) and “down” to deflate (air comes out).

Coupling the adaptors

Locate the military valve adaptor in the repair canister. The Seawave does not come with a pump, but the adaptor friction fits onto the Boston valve conical adaptor found on most pumps. (AirKayaks: Before doing ANYTHING, attach the adaptor to your pump with the string).

Lock the Innova adaptor onto the military valve with a slight twist, and push the conical adaptor in to friction fit the two. Since the Innova main chambers are inflated to 3 PSI, it is helpful to use a pump with pressure gauge to ensure the kayak is inflated appropriately. We did have a hard time preventing the Boston nozzle on our pump from popping off the adaptor – possibly some slight sandpaper might rough up the surface for a better friction fit. Worst case, one could glue the adaptor to the Boston valve nozzle.

Pumpig up the side chamber

We pumped up both side chambers until they filled out – about 30 strokes with a double action hand pump, each side.

Attaching the seat

While the chambers are still “softer”, push down on the foot braces and seat bases, to lock them under the side tubes; this becomes increasingly difficult to do once the kayak is fully inflated.

Attaching the seat

At this point, you want to attach the seat side straps to the side d-rings. Loop the strap (located on the rear of the seat back) up through the d-ring and then back, looping it through the seat buckle. Use the 2nd and 5th set of d-rings for tandem paddling, the 1st, 3rd and 6th for three, and the 4th (or even 3rd) for solo paddling.

Pumping up the side chamber

Finish topping off both main side chambers – this was another 20 pumps each side to reach 3 PSI.

Pumping up the floor

Last step, pump up the floor chamber to 3 PSI. At 40 strokes the gauge started to register, and at about 53 strokes we were hitting the 3 PSI mark, when we heard a slight hiss. The Seawave is constructed with a pressure relief valve in the floor, which will let out air once it reaches 3 PSI. Screw on the valve caps to protect the plungers from sand and salt, or from accidentally being pressed.

Easy to carry

Done, in less than 10 minutes. Once you understand the setup, it is simple and quick.

Deflating the Innova Seawave kayak

Deflation is just as easy. Simply turn all the valves to the open position and push out the air. Remove the tracking fin – the seats and braces can be left in place. The air can be quickly pushed out by either rolling up the kayak towards the valves, or pumping out the final air, using the deflate mode on your pump – once done, turn the valves to the inflate position so air doesn’t creep back in, and replace the wing-nut caps.

Eas to pack up

Then fold the sides of the kayak to the center (the long way) and then back out – basically in fourths and roughly 20″ wide. Then start folding/rolling in from each end, folding over each other towards the center. Use the cinch belt to hold it shut.This should then slip back into the bag, though it is a little bit of a tight fit.

Innova Seawave Features and Specifications

The Innova Seawave is constructed from a 1200 denier rubber-coated laminate material called Nitrylon – this consists of a synthetic rubber coating over polyester on the inside and outside of the tube.

Rugged nitrylon material

Nitrylon is the same material used in high-end Zodiac-type yacht tenders, and is stronger, more abrasion and puncture resistant than PVC as well as being greener – there is minimal out-gassing.

Military valve and pressure relief gauge

There are three 3 PSI inflation chambers utilizing military valves (both sides and floor) and 4 Twistloks (both seats and foot braces.) An integrated rear pressure relief valve releases pressure on the floor when inflation reaches 3 PSI.

Molded rubber handle

There are two molded handles, bow and stern.

Splash deck

Small front and rear decks keep water from splashing over the sides. These each measure 23 inches in length.

Scultped hull

A sculpted bow helps slice through the water.

Velcro system

Rope side decking for attaching gear runs the length of the kayak, with runner holders (5) evenly spaced at 38 inches apart.

Innova Seawave touring kayak set us as a tandem.

Velcro runs the perimeter of the hull upper. In conjunction with five sets of corded loops on the upper hull, one is able to attach optional single and double decks mounted on riser bars.

Integrated d-rings

There are six d-rings each side, with seating position numbers underneath. The d-rings are located 56, 58, 93, 105, 125 and 135 inches from the snout point.

Side cord/loop system

The previously mentioned corded loops (used for deck riser bars) could also be used to attach gear. These are situated 47, 50, 82, 85, 103, 106, 114, 117, 136 and 140 inches from the bow.

Inflatable foot brace system

There are two inflatable foot braces. The front brace is curved, measuring 14 x 7 inches, while the rear brace is square, measuring 8 x 19 inches. Each brace inflates to 3-inches deep utilizing a twistlok valve, with a 15 inch strap.

Seat back

The inflatable seats utilize one twistlok each, measuring 13 x 18 inches for the back and 17 x 18 for the base. There are three strap attachments – two 30-inch side straps (allowing 15 inches max leeway) and one 6-inch base strap. The seats can be inflated up to two inches thick.

There are five floor buckles with cloth loops for attaching seats, braces and anything else you can think of. These are located 29, 67, 92, 104, and 124 inches from the kayak nose.

Rudder attachments

Two small “periscopes” on the rear deck are used for attaching an optional rudder system.

Blow hole

A rear “blow hole” in the upper rear hull can be opened to allow water to escape.

Sculpted hull

The hull has 5 sculpted i-beam tubes creating the rounded hull shape. The tracking fin measures 4.5 inches tall and 7 inches wide.

Included 100L Backpack

The 100L backpack features a roll top closure and a deep front pocket, two padded shoulder straps, grab handle and two d-rings. Measurements are 41 x  x 10 x 17 inches unrolled, with front pocket dimensions of 14 x 8 x 4 inches.

Innova Seawave touring kayak set us as a tandem.

We did measurement tests. The Innova Seawave inflated is 180 inches (15 feet) and approximately 32 inches wide. Interior dimensions of the kayak are about 15 inches wide at the wider points, tapering down to 14 inches near the front seat and 13 inches near the back. Tube sides are approximately 8-9 inches in diameter, creating a seating well roughly 8 inches deep.

When set up for two people, per our instructions above, there are 64 inches from the front seat back to the interior snout, and 48 inches from seat back to brace when fully extended; the brace can be moved back up to 11 inches. There are 53 inches between the front and rear seat backs, with up to 44 inches from rear seat back to the brace; the brace can move back up to 13 inches. There are 39 inches behind the rear seat back, with 11 inches wide tapering down; 18″ are open with the rest under the rear deck. Each of the seats could move back and forth several inches.

Innova Seawave inflatable kayak set up as a solo.

When set up for one person (utilizing the 4th side d-rings and 3rd floor clip), the sky’s the limit! A whopping 61 inches is behind the seat and 97 inches from the seat back to interior bow.

New Innova Seawave inflatable kayak for 1-2+ paddlers.

While a three person (three seat) set up is touted, actually cramming the front and rear seats into position is a bit tough, and there are no associated seat base clips for those two positions. That said … if you do manage (using the 1st, 3rd and 6th side rings to attach the seats), the spacing comes out as follows: 40 inches of interior space behind the rear seat, 39 inches from rear seat back to center seat back, 41 inches from center seat back to front seat back, and 51 inches from front seat back to interior bow. The braces can fit from 23 to 32/33 inches from the two rear seat backs, but probably are best not even using them, gaining 7 inches.

Total payload weight is 551 lbs. person and gear.

Innova Seawave Inflatable Kayak On the Water.

We tested out the Innova Seawave both in calm waters and mild winds, both solo and as a tandem.

Innova Seawave inflatable kayak paddled solo.

I first took the Seawave out solo in some swells. With the seat in the “#1″ position, I was slightly rear of center. Despite the long length and my height of 5’4”, I was immediately impressed with how well it handled solo. The Seawave paddles well, it’s speedy and is fairly maneuverable, riding over swells with ease. I found the seats to be fairly comfortable.

Easy to carry

As the handles are located on the bow and stern sides, it is a little awkward to carry solo – one need to balance it over one’s shoulder.

Innova Seawave inflatable kayak paddled solo.

My husband then took the Seawave out in calm water. The open design makes it quite easy to get in – and out – without any issues. He also felt the kayak handled extremely well, but was less impressed with the seats – he would have preferred something with a higher back and more support.

We then moved the seats to take the Seawave out as a tandem. Once again, the open design makes launching a breeze. With two adults (5’4″ and 6’2″) the kayak was quite roomy. In fact, I could have moved up another foot without an issue, but there was no lack of room for my husband’s legs in the back seat. While the Seawave is billed as a one to three person unit, it is a very roomy two person design, with enough space for some gear, a small child or dog to fit in. As a three person design, the paddlers would need to be small.

The material is rugged enough that I would not hesitate to bring along a canine buddy – and there’s certainly room. The photo above shows me paddling with my buddy Eddie in the Innova Sunny, constructed from the same material.

Another thing to note: If you plan on changing the seating positions often, investing in a few carabiners/clips would be worth it. It becomes tedious to keep unlooping and relooping the seat straps through the d-rings. A simple carabiner at the end would allow you to quickly clip and unclip the seats.

Packing up took just a few minutes. The “smooth skin” of the Nitrylon material allows one to just wipe down the kayak to dry it off, and then fold up into the pack. I did notice slight scuffing  – Innova says the McNett UVTech is very helpful as a coating to keep the kayak lustrous and prevent scuffs.

Bottom Line on the Innova Seawave Inflatable Kayak:

Seawave paddled by three.

The Innova Seawave is a wonderful inflatable kayak for those wanting portability, simplicity, versatility, easy entry and lots of storage options. The kayak paddles smoothly and tracks well.

Seawave rudder

Those paddlers wanting more control can purchase the optional Seawave rudder.

Innova Seawave touring inflatable kayak for 1-2+ paddlers.

Optional spray decks for solo or tandem paddling provide a fair amount of protection from the elements, lots of interior storage space for day or camping gear, as well as numerous options to bungee items to the upper hull.

Set up is very simple and takes less than 10 minutes. Take down is equally simple – wipe down and fold/roll up. The Nitrilon material is rugged and easy to clean, yet still packs up extremely flat and compact.

Environmentally-conscious paddlers will find the minimal-PVC and China-free construction appealing.

The included backpack is compact and rugged, perfect for a trek into remote areas or riding mass-transit.

It can also be stashed in the trunk of a small car, and is small enough to qualify for carry-on during your next plane flight – it’s a great choice for travel.

Innova Seawave inflatable kayak paddled solo.

The Seawave is perfect for slow-moving rivers, lakes and coastal paddling.

MSRP on the Seawave inflatable kayak is $999. For more information, or to purchase, visit the Innova Seawave product page at AirKayaks.com. Stay tuned – we will have an upcoming article on the Seawave spray decks, as well as a video.

This past week we had the opportunity to take our first look at the Innova Solar 410C inflatable kayak – a 2+ person kayak for recreational paddling.

Innova Solar 410C set us for tandem paddling.

The Innova line is unique for a number of reasons. First, all the kayaks are handmade in the Czech Republic – the factory has manufactured inflatable boats for well over 50 years. Secondly, the manufacturing process produces kayaks that can become quite compact, making them a great choice for travel. And third, the kayaks are environmentally-friendly as they are mostly PVC-free.

While various iterations of the Solar have been available in Europe for years, Innova recently brought in the newly-redesigned Solar 410C. We had our first opportunity to take out the kayak late last year. So here is our write-up on the the Innova Solar 410C inflatable tandem kayak, which weighs 36 lbs in the pack, is 13 feet 2 inches in length and has a payload of 595 lbs for two persons and gear. (Please note: some of the information will be duplicated from other Innova reviews).

Getting Started with the Innova Solar 410C

The box as received measures 25 x 16 x 11 inches, weighing in at 40 lbs.

What's in the box.

Inside is a very nifty and compact backpack with adjustable shoulder straps, front pouch pocket and roll top closure. This contains the kayak body, tracking fin, foot rests, repair kit, instructions, valve adaptor, seats and sponge. Packed dimensions are 25 x 16 x 10 inches as received in the bag, with a weight of 38 lbs for the pack and contents.

We read through the included instruction manuals. Just like all the other Innova  products, the Innova Solar manual is surprisingly detailed in some aspects, while lacking in others. As the kayaks are made in Europe, many of the details are based around European specs and regulations and can sound more complicated than it actually is. Please also note that some of the instructions/diagrams have errors.

Unfolding the kayak

First step, unpack and unfold the kayak body. What is immediately noticeable is how FLAT the kayak is when deflated – of course, this makes it quite compact for travel.

Attaching the fin.

Install the tracking fin into the “shoe” before inflating the kayak. Slip the end with the larger slot in first, making sure that the fin is pointing towards the “back” of the kayak. This enables it to slide in enough to fit in the second side. The first time we tried this, we struggled to get the second slot into position but this gets easier with use.

Inflating the foot brace.

The instructions suggest attaching and inflating the foot braces and seats first, but these come already attached from the factory – the front seat is attached to the 2nd set of floor clips, and the back seat to the 4th set; the braces are attached to the first and second sets. Both utilize a twistlock valve, which performs as it sounds – twist the end to open or close the valve. The Boston valves will not friction fit over the twistlock so you will have to do one of three things – have another paddler hold the valve over the twistlock; carefully negotiate holding the adaptor and twistlock together with one hand while pumping with the other; or give up and blow it up with your mouth. It took about 1 to 2 puffs to get each foot brace filled out. Then pump up the inflatable seats to 1 to 1.5 PSI (the pressure is not mentioned in the instruction manual). Since this also utilizes a twistlock, once again you need to balance – this took about 5 pumps/puffs. Press the seat back down and loop the seat bottom strap through the plastic buckle on the floor behind the seat. Move up to the front seat and do the same, tucking the seat base edges under the side chambers. AirKayaks note: Here is a nifty little home-made adaptor that works with these twistlocks.

At this point, you want to attach the seat side straps to the side d-rings. Loop the strap (located on the rear of the seat back) up through the d-ring and then back, looping it through the seat buckle. Use the 1st and 3rd set of d-rings for tandem paddling, the 1st, 2nd and 4th for three, and the 2nd for solo paddling. AirKayaks note: It is much simpler to purchase some small carabiners and attach them to the end of the strap loops. Then you can simply clip these into the d-rings without all the “reweaving.”

Opening and closing the valve.

The Innova Solar 410C features three main inflation chambers utilizing military valves – one for the floor and one for each side. The military-style plunger valve is simple to use – with your finger, twist the plunger slightly to the “up” position to inflate (air goes in but doesn’t come back out) and “down” to deflate (air comes out).

Innova adaptor attached to pump

Locate the military valve adaptor in the repair canister. The kayak does not come with a pump, but the adaptor friction fits onto the Boston valve conical adaptor found on most pumps. (AirKayaks: Before doing ANYTHING, attach the adaptor to your pump with the string).

The Innova instructions suggest pumping up the side chambers first, and the floor last.  We found it easier to pump up the floor first, then pump up each side chamber half way. This provides enough “give” to install/move the seats and braces. Then top off each side.

Following this format, lock the Innova adaptor onto the military valve with a slight twist, and push the conical adaptor in to friction fit the two. Since the Innova main chambers are inflated to 3 PSI, it is helpful to use a pump with pressure gauge to ensure the kayak is inflated appropriately. We did have a hard time preventing the Boston nozzle on our pump from popping off the adaptor – possibly some slight sandpaper might rough up the surface for a better friction fit. Worst case, one could glue the adaptor to the Boston valve nozzle.

Pump up the floor chamber – this took approximately 42 pumps with a double action hand pump. Screw on the valve cap to protect the plunger from sand and salt, or from accidentally being pressed.

Pumping up the kayak

Pump up the side chambers, partially, on each side – we did about 25 strokes each.

Positioning the seats.

Reposition/tuck in the foot braces and seats.

Pump up the side chamber

Finish topping off both main side chambers – this was another 13 pumps each side to reach 3 PSI. Screw on the valve caps to protect the plungers from sand and salt, or from accidentally being pressed.

Lightweight.

Done, less than 10 minutes, surprising simple and very quick.

Deflating the Innova Solar 410C kayak

Deflation is just as easy. Simply turn all the valves to the open position and push out the air. Remove the tracking fin (if installed) – the seats and braces can be left in place. The air can be quickly pushed out by either rolling up the kayak towards the valves, or pumping out the final air, using the deflate mode on your pump – once done, turn the valves to the inflate position so air doesn’t creep back in, and replace the wing-nut caps.

Folding up the kayak.

Then fold the kayak in half the long way, then in half again – smooth it out. Starting at the rear, fold over the snout up to the fin boot, then fold again. Starting at the other end, fold back about a foot, then again and again. Fold the two sides together and use the cinch belt to hold it shut. This should then slip back into the bag.

Innova Solar 410C Features and Specifications

The Innova Solar 410C is constructed from a 1200 denier rubber-coated laminate material called Nitrylon – this consists of a synthetic rubber coating over polyester on the inside and outside of the tube.

Nitrilon material.

Nitrylon is the same material used in high-end Zodiac-type yacht tenders, and is stronger, more abrasion and puncture-resistant than PVC as well as being greener – there is minimal out-gassing.

Military valve

There are seven inflation chambers – three 3 PSI inflation chambers utilizing military valves (both sides and floor) and 4 Twistlocks (both seats and foot braces.)

Molded carrying handles

There are two molded rubber handles (front and rear) which sit on top of 17-inch splash decks with rope tie-downs.

Front foot brace

The front foot brace has two “positions” (humps) and measures roughly 12 inches deep by 13 inches wide, with the sides stuffed under the main tubes. The humps are 7 inches apart. The brace position has a leeway of about two inches forward and back. There is one d-ring at the back of the brace buckle, which can be used as a gear tie-down.

Inflatable seat.

The inflatable seats have one twistlock valve, a bottom strap and two side straps. The seat base measures 19 inches wide by 16 inches deep (inflatable portion is 17″ wide by 15 inched deep, and 3 inches high). The back is about 17 inches wide by 15 inches tall (14 inches inflated).

Rear foot brace

A rear foot brace is more rectangular, measuring 17 inches wide by 9 inches deep and up to 5 inches thick. It has about 15 inches of strapping.

Multiple d-rings for attaching gear.

There are four sets of upper d-rings which can be used with the seats or for attaching gear. These are located 57, 89, 107 and 117 inches from the outer snout.

Floor straps for seat and brace

There are five sets of straps and loops on the floor, for attaching the foot braces, seats and/or gear. These are located 27, 67, 97, 115 and 124 inches from the inner snout – each of these has d-rings except the second, which has two buckles for seat back and brace.

Foot brace slots for solo paddling.

A numbered boot system is located 55 to 65 inches from the snout. This features slots three inches apart: these are referenced in the instructions, and used to attach the foot brace based on paddler height, when paddling solo.

Mesh net for gear storage

A mesh cargo net is situated at the rear, measuring roughly 13 x 14 inches. There are four d-rings tucked under the side tubes, to attach gear under the net; these are located 23 and 41 inches from the inner tail.

Pressure relief valve

The floor features an integrated pressure relief valve just behind the military valve. This will release pressure at 3 PSI, whether over-inflated or from air expansion due to heat.

Removable tracking fin and sculpted hull.

The hull has 5 sculpted i-beam tubes creating the rounded hull shape. The optional tracking fin measures 4.5 inches tall and 7 inches wide.

We measured the Solar. Outer dimensions were 164 inches from “eyelet to eyelet” with an exterior width of 33 inches at midpoint. The interior length was 160 inches with a 14-15 inch width, again at midpoint. The tubes are roughly 8-9 inches wide and create a well 8 inches deep.

Innova Solar 410C set us for tandem paddling.

We measured the tandem paddling set-up as previously mentioned. With the front seat-back attached to the 2nd set of floor d-rings, the side straps attached to the 1st set of tube d-rings and the brace extended as far farward as possible, there is 39 and 46 inches from the seat back to the brace humps; the brace can move back about 4 inches, giving a tapered 11 inches from brace to inner snout. As the seat base strap is fairly short, by not buckling the seat base, the front seat can move up about 10 inches and back about 3 inches. With the rear seat-back attached to the fourth floor d-ring, the side straps attached to the 3rd set of tube d-rings and the rear brace extended as far farward as possible, there is 45 inches from the seat back to seat back, and 41 inches to the brace flipped forward (35 inches when flipped back). There is 48 inches behind the rear seat (30 inches of this is open) and is 13 inches wide, tapering down. Again, by not buckling the seat base, the rear seat can move up about 10 inches and back about 5 inches.

Innova Solar 410C set us for three paddlers.

We then set up the Solar for three paddlers using a Seawave seat for the third. By moving the front seat all the way forward and moving the rear seat all the way back, we were able to position the middle seat using this configuration – the 1st, 2nd and 4th tube buckles and 2nd, 3rd and 5th floor buckles.  This gave measurements of 59″ from front seat back to inner snout, and 40 to 48 inches to the brace. The second seat had 27 inches to the front seat back, and 27 inches from the second seat back to rear seat back. There was 36 inches behind the rear seat to the inner tail, with about 21 inches open. If you don’t use the floor buckle, you can move the front seat up another 9 inches, giving more room to the two back paddlers – who will greatly appreciate it.

Innova Solar 410C set us for solo paddling.

Last set up was for solo paddling. We attached the seat base to the 3rd set of floor clips and the side straps to the 2nd set of d-rings. This gave 91 inches from seat back to inner snout, and 64 inches behind the seat (50 inches open) – plenty of room for gear. There are four slot positions for the foot brace on the floor, each one set up for various paddler heights. Weave the foot brace strap through the slots and clip. Measurements were as follows from seat back to brace: Slot 4 – 39 inches, Slot 3 – 36 inches, Slot 2 – 33 inches, Slot 1 31 inches.

Total payload weight is 595 lbs. person and gear.

Innova Solar 410C On the Water.

We tested out the Innova Solar 410C over a few days.

Easy to carry on one's shoulder.

I first took it out solo on a calm day. As the handles are located on the bow and stern sides, it is a little awkward to carry solo, though it is possible to hook it over your shoulder. With two people carrying, it’s great.

Innova Solar 410C paddled solo

First of all, this is incredibly roomy for my 5’4″ – perfect for carrying lots of gear. I was impressed with how well it handled, and how easily it rode over the water. The kayak is pretty zippy and – for a kayak this long – it turns very easily. While I calculated the foot brace Slot 2 as appropriate for my height (based on the instruction manual) I actually felt more comfortable on Slot 3.

Innova Solar 410C paddled solo

My 6’2″ husband then took it out solo. He felt it handled well, though mentioned a slight wag in the front, feeling the nose was up a bit out of the water – not something I noticed, but weight in the front would help. He loved the easy entry and exit.

Innova Solar 410C paddled as a tandem

We then took it out tandem in slight wind. The Solar paddles well as a tandem, it’s fast and with the extra weight just slightly less maneuverable – but still pretty good. We headed into the wind and it paddled well. With hindsight, I would have positioned my seat up closer to the nose, and Chuck’s seat back a little farther, as his knees were bent a bit too much – possibly moving back to the fourth set of d-rings. Based on that, I am a bit hard-pressed to see three people paddling this kayak unless they are fairly small. Certainly, a dog or child would fit in-between the two seats – in fact, the inflatable foot brace could be a great child’s seat.

I then took the kayak out solo in a somewhat windy situation with good-sized chop. With no weight in the kayak – and the long length – I really struggled to paddle. It would ride over the waves, but I wasn’t really in control. In high waves, with the lower side walls some water will splash in. For solo paddling, this is best used in calmer waters, or possibly with more weight.

Packing up took just a few minutes. The “smooth skin” of the Nitrylon material allows one to just wipe down the kayak to dry it off, and then fold up into the pack. I did notice slight scuffing  – Innova says the McNett UVTech is very helpful as a coating to keep the kayak lustrous and prevent scuffs.

Bottom Line on the Innova Solar 410C Inflatable Kayak:

The Innova Solar 410C is a good recreational kayak suitable for those wanting portability, simplicity, easy entry and lots of storage options. On calm waters – such as lakes, inlets and slower-moving rivers – the kayak paddles smoothly and tracks well as both a single and a tandem. On rougher waters, be prepared to add weight if paddling solo, and to dress appropriately, as waves can splash over the side walls.

Innova Solar 410C paddled as a tandem

The Solar 410C is roomy enough for two average adults with an afternoon of gear, though slightly narrow. This would also be a great choice for an adult and child or dog, or those needing enough storage space to haul camping equipment.

Paddled with three people.

While it’s possible to add an optional third seat, three paddlers would be cramped unless they were fairly small.

Rugged enough for canine claws.

The material is rugged enough that I would not hesitate to bring along a canine buddy – and there’s certainly room. The photo above shows me paddling with my buddy Eddie in the Innova Sunny, constructed from the same material.

Set up is very simple and takes less than 10 minutes. Take down is equally simple – wipe down and fold/roll up.

The Nitrilon material is rugged and easy to clean, yet still packs up extremely flat and compact.

Environmentally-conscious paddlers will find the minimal-PVC and China-free construction appealing.

Fits in the trunk of a car.

The included backpack is compact and rugged, perfect for a trek into remote areas or riding mass-transit. It can also be stashed in the trunk of a small car, and is small enough to easily take on your next plane flight – it’s a great choice for travel.

MSRP on the Solar 410C inflatable kayak is $749, and it’s available in two colors – green or red. For more information, or to purchase, visit the Innova Solar 410C product page at AirKayaks.com.

Posted by: airkayaks | February 16, 2017

New 2017 Kokopelli Inflatable Packraft Lineup

We recently received news on the new 2017 Kokopelli lineup of inflatable packrafts.

Kokopelli Packraft with Spray deck

For those unfamiliar with the term, “packrafts” are loosely defined as a an inflatable raft weighing under 10 lbs, that can easily be packed/rolled up, making them a great choice for accessing remote locations. While the sport originated in Alaska, the popularity is rapidly expanding globally.

The 2016 Kokopelli line-up consisted of four whitewater models – the Nirvana and Nirvana XL in self-bailing and spray deck versions – joined by three new Touring series: the Castaway, Castaway XL and Twain two-person version. The Touring Series features packrafts with removable tracking fins, making them better suited for calm water paddling.

new Leafield D7 military valve

While Kokopelli’s main product lineup is not changing in 2017, several new features come into play. Foremost, all Kokopelli packrafts will come with upgraded Leafield D7 military valves, rather than the current Boston valves. The D7 valve has a shorter internal profile than other valves making it ideal for smaller diameter tubes such as inflatable kayak floors. The seal was also designed to be self-cleaning, reducing leakage risks due to dirt contamination.

All models with Tizip now have a 19 inch opening (up from 16 inches) making it easier to access stored gear.

New French gray color.

The Nirvana Whitewater series also sports a number of changes, beginning with an added color to round out the selection. The new French Gray (more of a desaturated Army gray-green) is for those opting for less visibility. All Nirvana models now will come with a back band, rather than inflatable seat rest, which provides more coverage and lower back support when traversing rapids. Four d-rings have also been added on the inner tube, allowing paddlers to attach optional thigh straps for more responsive handling.

The Nirvana Self-Bailing models have been slightly redesigned with more volume in the stern. This provides more buoyancy and a slightly lower waterline, eliminating water pooling issues. While the majority of Kokopelli packrafts features two main chambers, the Nirvana Self-Bailing with Tizip now has one main chamber, thus increasing the storage area.

The Touring series – consisting of the Castaway, Castaway XL and Twain 2 – will remain virtually unchanged, except for TiZip increases and the new Leafield D7 military valves.

koko-cast1

Weights range from 7.3 to 13.8 lbs. All models come with an inflation “bag” weighing a mere 4 ounces, though they also can be pumped up using a traditional hand or foot pump. Prices range from $725 to $1099 dependent upon the model and options.

The 2017 models are in-transit, and expected to be available in late February. For more details or to order, visit the Kokopelli Packraft product pages at www.AirKayaks.com.

Posted by: airkayaks | February 11, 2017

Product Review: Aire Tributary Strike Solo Inflatable Kayak

We recently posted our first review on Aire’s Tributary inflatable kayak product-line. The Tributary models – which are made overseas – offer great value for those on a budget or unwilling to make a large investment; these include the Strikes, Sawtooth and Tomcat kayaks as well as several rafts.

Aire Tributary Strike Solo inflatable kayak

This week we had the first opportunity to take out the Aire Tributary Strike 1, a 10 foot 3-inch one-person inflatable with a price of $799. The Strike is billed as a crossover kayak, capable of spanning calm water to rapids. Please note, some of this may be repeated from other write-ups.

Aire Tributary Strike I Inflatable Kayak: Getting Started

The box as received measures 29 x 16 x 13 inches, weighing in at 33 lbs.

What's in the box.

Inside is the Strike body, one Cheetah seat, flip strap, instructions and repair kit with adaptor, adaptor tube, wrench and patch material (including some TearAid). The Strike does not come with a carrying case. The body alone weighs 26 lbs, or 29.5 lbs with the seat. The folded body measures roughly 28 x 15 x 12 inches.

Aire Tributary Strike Setup/Inflatation

Unfolding the kayak

We read through the included instruction manual. First step, unfold the kayak body. Then pump up tthe main chambers until softly filled.

Closing the valve for inflation

The Aire Tributary Strike features three main inflation chambers utilizing Summit II military valves – one for the floor and one for each side. The military-style plunger valve is simple to use – with your finger, twist the plunger slightly to the “up” position to inflate (air goes in but doesn’t come back out) and “down” to deflate (air comes out). Please note – the military valve push pins can sometimes deceptively look as if they are UP when actually in the deflate mode. When this happens, as soon as you remove the pump adaptor all the air will swoosh out. So, make sure they are truly popped up. On the positive side, this is so easy to pump up, it’s not a big issue.

Unlike many kayaks, the Aire Tributary Strike has two main inflation valves at opposite sides of the kayak – one on the upper rear right and one on the upper bow left.

Couping the pump to the valve.

Locate the military valve adaptor in the repair kit. The Strike does not come with a pump, but the adaptor allows one to use the Boston valve conical adaptor found on most pumps. To couple the Strike adaptor with the Boston valve adaptor, Aire has included a two-inch clear plastic tube. Insert the end of the Strike adaptor into one side of the clear tube, and then insert the Boston valve adaptor onto the other side via friction fit. Lock the Aire adaptor onto the military valve with a slight twist. Since the Strike main chambers are inflated to 2.5 PSI, it is helpful to use a pump with pressure gauge to ensure the kayak is inflated appropriately. If you don’t have a gauge, pump up until rigid but with about a half-inch “give” when pressed with your thumb. (AirKayaks note: Be very careful to stash the adaptors some place where they won’t get lost. Even better, if you don’t need the clear plastic tube for another valve, glue it onto the end of the Strike adaptor so it is one less thing to lose.)

Pumping up the kayak

Pump up the side chambers first. As the instructions stated to “fill until a soft pressure” we placed 30 strokes each side with our double action hand pump – these were still soft but mostly unfurled. We then pumped up the floor 17 strokes.

Attaching the seat.

The instructions next state to attach the “Cheetah seat.” While the seat setup is fairly simple, there is an online video showing how to connect the strapping.

Attaching the seat.

The seat features “fore and aft” seat clips, two each side for a total of four. These attach to the kayak via a series of 8 cloth loops (each side) that are integral to the kayak. Begin by positioning the seat roughly mid-center – we chose to place the front seat back at the fifth loop. For the initial set up, one needs to attach the base straps to the kayak loops on the floor. This is done by detaching the four straps from the kayak seat, unweaving the webbing from the strap clips, then looping the webbing through the floor loops and then back onto the strap clips. In the future (once you’ve decided where you want the seats) the base straps can be left in position, allowing one to easily clip in the seat as needed.

Attaching the seat.

The video suggests spanning three loops, but the straps were not long enough to do that. So, we placed the seat front webbing at the third loop and the back at the sixth loop (skipping 4 and 5). The seats can easily be repositioned by changing loops, or adjusting the strap lengths, dependent on paddler sizes.

Pumping up the kayak

Now, top off the kayak by filling each side and floor chambers to 2.5 PSI. If using a pressure gauge, please note that the pressure will only read while you are pumping (needle drops up and down), since most gauges work on back pressure. It took us another 14 strokes to fill each side, with another 17 on the floor.

At this point we want to point out a great feature not mentioned in the instructions. The Aire Tributary Strikes (as well as the Tomcats and Sawtooth) each have a pressure relief valve integrated into the floor chamber. If you happen to over-pump – or the floor heats up in the sun – the pressure relief valve will release air at 2.5 PSI with a short hissing sound. The valve is pretty unnoticeable, as it is located under the floor covering, and rear of the floor Summit II valve.

Finish off by screwing on the valve caps to protect the plungers from sand and salt, or from accidentally being pressed.

Attaching the flip strap.

At this point, tighten up the seat straps. You will notice another long piece of webbing with buckles – this is the flip strap. Attach the flip strap to one rear upper buckle on the seat back, then wind the strap around and under the kayak, then up the other side, attaching to the other rear upper buckle. Cinch tight. The flip strap has two purposes – one, it can be used to right the kayak in the water if it overturns and two, it provides more structural rigidity for the seat back.

strike19a

You’re done! The Strike is remarkably easy and fast to set up – less than 10 minutes.

Packing Up the Strike Inflatable Kayak

Deflation is just as easy. Unclip the seats and flip strap (leave the floor straps in place). Then simply push down and lock the Summit II valves (military) to the open position and the air will swoosh out. You can then fold in each side to the center, then in half (into fourths), and then fold up to a “square” or roll up. It’s helpful to obtain a cinch strap to fasten the perimeter of the kayak body and seat together, and keep it from unrolling. In a pinch, one can set the Cheetah seat on top of the kayak body, and use the flip strap as a cinch, bundling up the seat with the kayak. As a side note, while you can press out most of the air, to really minimize the size/footprint, it is best to pump out the final air, using the deflate mode on your pump. Turn the valves to the inflate position so air doesn’t creep back in, and replace the wing-nut caps.

Aire Tributary Strike Kayak Features and Specifications

Rugged material with smooth skin

The Aire Tributary Strike is constructed from 1000 denier PVC on both the upper side and hull. Two-way zippered compartments run the length of the sides and floor, housing replaceable 10-mil urethane bladders.

Zipper locks keep bladders closed

There are three “zipper locks” ensuring that the compartments do not accidentally open. The seams are welded.

Seam tape on zippers

Side tape runs along the perimeter and floor, to cover the zippers.

Summit II military valves.

There are three 2.5-PSI inflation chambers utilizing Summit II military valves (both sides and floor). The main chambers are located opposite each other, and are billed as “wrap around” tubes. According to Aire, this gives the Strike more rigidity and stability when going through rapids.

Molded rubber handles

Two carry handles can be found at the bow and the stern. Each of these consist of a molded rubber handle with webbing straps and buckles; the handles can be lengthened or shortened roughly 2-6 inches by tightening or loosening the webbing, or the handle can be removed completely. Adjustments can be made for hand size, gloves, or removing for better comfort if needed.

Numerous cloth loops for attaching gear

There are eight sets of 3.5-inch long cloth loops on each side – these are used to attach/readjust the seating position, or for attaching gear. The loops are positioned approximately 12, 24, 36, 48, 60, 71, 84 and 96″ inches from the interior snout, with the last set positioned 12 inches from the interior rear point.

D-rings on underside

There are two stainless d-rings on the hull underside at the bow and stern.

Flip handles

Two cloth “flip handles” are located mid-center on the underside; these can also be used to right the kayak if flipped in the water, but can also serve as quasi-carrying handles.

Mesh guards on self-bailing ports

The Strike is “self-bailing.” Four mesh “screens” (towards front and rear, one on each side) cover openings, allowing any splashed-in water to fall into the side wells and seep out. Conversely, water may seep back in if the kayak is heavily loaded. The mesh screens ensure that no debris enters into the kayak from below. The floor is quite sculpted (humped) which helps funnel the water into the sides.

Attaching the seat.

There is one “Cheetah” seat with a waterproof cover and some foam padding. The seat back measures 22 inches wide (at the widest point) by 14 inches high and about 1 inch thick. The seat base is roughly 12 inches deep by 15 inches wide and slightly padded at 0.75 inches thick. There are four attachment straps (measuring 16 inches long when doubled) with roughly 4 to 5 inches of leeway, so in conjunction with the 8 sets of cloth loops, the Strike offers virtually infinite seating arrangements. The seat back base is tapered, making it easier to relocate. One flip strap attaches to the seat back and measures 93 inches long.

Storage on back of seat

On the back of the seat is a very nifty integrated pack which measures 12″ wide by 10″ tall and 5″ deep with mesh rear and side panels. The top zippers shut with some additional velcro and three cloth loops. On the back of the pack is another slim “pocket” with velcro closure, measuring 10″ wide by 5.5 inches deep. A padded drink holder sits next to the pack – this could possibly be rigged up to house a fishing pole.

Aire Tributary Strike Solo inflatable kayak

We did measurement tests. The exterior measures 126 to 127 inches – a few inches longer than the published 10’3″ – and is 36 inches wide, with a 12″ rise both bow and stern. The interior dimensions are 108 inches “point to point” and 16 inches at the widest point. The tubes are 10 inches in diameter and – with the humpbacked floor – creates a seating well roughly 5 to 7-or-so inches deep.

Aire Tributary Strike Solo inflatable kayak

With the seat set up as previously mentioned (using the 3rd and 6th loops) there are 44 inches behind the rear seat back, 13 inches wide and tapering to a point. We measured 60″ from the front seat back to the interior snout.

Suggest payload is 300 lbs. The Strike has a five-year warranty.

Aire Tributary Strike Solo On the Water

I must preface this by saying we have no whitewater – just a large lake, waves and boat wake. So I took out the Aire Tributary Strike over a couple of days in calm weather.

strike27a

First off, the Strike is very easy to hop into – the 2.5 PSI sides and 1000 denier hull feel firm and rugged. The Cheetah seat is quite comfortable, and the ability to access small items easily is a plus.

Aire Tributary Strike Solo on the water.

As to be expected, the nose wafted when attempting to paddle straight. While this may be disconcerting at first, one starts to get used to it and compensate – no power paddling. On calm water, the Strike is not speedy, nor overly slow, but it IS phenomenally responsive, reminding me of a phrase I once read – “turns on a dime and still gives you back change.”

Despite the wider beam, with the humped floor, I sat up high enough that I did not notice any knuckle rub. While the lower center of gravity feels quite stable when seated, I was not able to standup.

As the bow is somewhat open (and there are openings in the bow and stern), in wave situations the water can crash over, but will quickly drain out through the mesh-covered holes. Larger paddlers may experience some water naturally seeping back in from the drain holes, and may wish to dress accordingly. That said, I did not notice any water coming into the seating well.

Stable enough to standup.

I came back to shore and put a 12-lb pack into the snout. Bingo. This was enough to seat the kayak in the water slightly better and even out the paddling – but not totally. Additionally, the added weight allowed me to stand up briefly without feeling tippy. I still did not notice any water creeping in.

Easy to carry

The Strike does not have side carrying handles. You can do one of three things: try using the flip handle, fashion a strap between the flip handle and one of the cloth loops, or simply loosen up the seat and hang the kayak over your shoulder.

Aire Tributary Strike Solo – Bottom Line

The Aire Tributary Strike is billed as a “crossover” capable of both flat and whitewater, but in effect, it is a bit more whitewater than flat water – if you plan on doing a lot of calm stretches, you might consider gluing on a finbox for a removable fin. That said, this could be a great choice for those paddling in situations requiring both long, gentle stretches and bouts of rapids or for those interested in a wider range of paddling situations without investing in multiple kayaks. For those only interested in whitewater, the Aire Tributary Tomcat might be more appropriate.

Aire Tributary Strike Solo on the water.

In calm water, the v-hull design provides better paddling , though addition of weight in the front will stabilize the tracking. The Cheetah seat is quite comfortable, providing support and storage options. The multiple floor loops offer virtually infinite seating positions for all types of paddler sizes, as well as providing attachment options for gear.

View of underside.

In whitewater, the Strike is fun and agile; the raised nose and tail – with the flatter base – make the kayak quite maneuverable while the wider beam provides a bit more stability. The mesh-covered ports allow water to pass through quickly, while ensuring that debris doesn’t come back in.

Fits in the trunk of a small car.

At 29.5 lbs with the seat, the Strike is quite portable, and easily fits in the trunk of a small car or a closet. The smaller folded footprint makes it a great choice for RVs, plane travel and those limited by space.

Set up is extremely easy, and takes just over 5 minutes. The smoother, water-resistant coating provides for easy cleaning and drying, making take-down less of a chore – though water will get trapped inside the zippers. Yet the 1000 denier hull also feels quite rugged – almost bombproof.

Aire Tributary Strike Solo on the water.

Those paddlers that just want to get out on the water, and have fun without a lot of fuss, will find the simplicity of the Strike quite appealing. The open cockpit design makes entry and exit a boon to seniors or those with physical limitations.

MSRP is $799. For more information or to purchase, see the Aire Tributary Strike Solo product page on AirKayaks.com, or view the other Tributary inflatable kayaks. Stay tuned for more product write-ups coming soon.

Well-known in the paddling world for top-notch quality, Aire has been manufacturing high-end inflatable rafts and kayaks out of their plant in Idaho for over 25 years ago. With the increased interest in inflatables, Aire introduced their Tributary line, an economical version made overseas, nearly 14 years ago. The Tributary models offer great value for those on a budget or unwilling to make a large investment; these include the Strikes, Sawtooth and Tomcat kayaks as well as several rafts.

Aire Tributary Sawtooth Inflatable Kayak.

This week we had the first opportunity to take out the Aire Tributary Sawtooth, a 13 foot 3-inch two-person inflatable weighing 35 lbs with a price of $749.

Aire Tributary Sawtooth Inflatable Tandem Kayak: Getting Started

The box as received measures 25 x 22 x 12 inches, weighing in at 40 lbs.

What's included

Inside is the Sawtooth body, two inflatable seats, removable tracking fin, instructions and repair kit with adaptor, adaptor tube, wrench and patch material (including some TearAid) but does not come with a carrying case.The Sawtooth body alone weighs 31 lbs; each seat weighs 1.7 lbs for a total of 35 lbs with fin. The folded body measures roughly 26 x 18 x 10 inches.

Aire Tributary Sawtooth 2 Setup/Inflatation

Unfolding the kayak body

We read through the included instruction manual. First step, unfold the kayak body. Then pump up the main chambers until softly filled.

Closing the valve for inflation

The Aire Tributary Sawtooth features three main inflation chambers utilizing Summit II military valves – one for the floor and one for each side. The military-style plunger valve is simple to use – with your finger, twist the plunger slightly to the “up” position to inflate (air goes in but doesn’t come back out) and “down” to deflate (air comes out). Please note – the military valve push pins can sometimes deceptively look as if they are UP when actually in the deflate mode. When this happens, as soon as you remove the pump adaptor all the air will swoosh out. So, make sure they are truly popped up. On the positive side, this is so easy to pump up, it’s not a big issue.

Valve adaptor set-up.

Locate the military valve adaptor in the repair kit. The Sawtooth does not come with a pump, but the adaptor allows one to use the Boston valve conical adaptor found on most pumps. To couple the Sawtooth adaptor with the Boston valve adaptor, Aire has included a two-inch clear plastic tube. Insert the end of the Sawtooth adaptor into one side of the clear tube, and then insert the Boston valve adaptor onto the other side, via friction fit. Lock the Aire adaptor onto the military valve with a slight twist. Since the Sawtooth main chambers are inflated to 2.5 PSI, it is helpful to use a pump with pressure gauge to ensure the kayak is inflated appropriately. AirKayaks note: Be very careful to stash the adaptors some place where they won’t get lost.

Pumping up the kayak

Pump up the side chambers first. As the instructions stated to “fill until a soft pressure” we placed 30 strokes each side with our double action hand pump – these were still soft but mostly unfurled. We then pumped up the floor 20 strokes.

The instructions next state to attach the “pillow seats.”

Attaching the pillow seat.

Begin by positioning the seats; typically, the front paddler will be roughly mid-center with the rear paddler towards the back. For the initial setup, we placed the front seat back between the 5th and 6th loops, and the rear seat back at the tenth loop.

Attaching the pillow seat.

Each of the seats feature “fore and aft” web straps (four to each seat), which are attached to the kayak via a series of 12 cloth loops (each side) that are integral to the kayak. This is done by unweaving the webbing from the strap clips, then looping the webbing through the floor loops and then back onto the strap clips. (AirKayaks note: You may want to obtain eight small carabiners – or even a set of bathtub curtain rings – to clip onto the ends of the seat strap loops. This would allow you to easily attach the seat to the cloth loops without all the buckle weaving.)

Attaching the pillow seat.

The instructions state to span two loops for each seat. So, we placed the front seat webbing at the fourth and seventh loop (skipping 5 and 6) and the rear seat webbing at the 8th and 11th loops. The seats can easily be repositioned by changing loops, or adjusting the strap lengths, dependent on paddler sizes.

Attaching the adaptor to the seat valve

Next, pump up the seats. Each seat back has one tube filler. Remove the tube dust cap and then remove the clear plastic tube from the kayak adaptor, and use the clear plastic to couple the Boston valve adaptor to the tube head. It took about 3 pumps to fill it out, as the seats have a max pressure limit of 2 PSI. Additionally (if lazy) one can leave the clear tube intact and blow up the seat back by mouth – this took about 5 puffs. At this point we will note that you can vary the softness/rigidity of the back to a desired comfort level by varying the amount of air put in.

Replace the dust cap on the tube filler, then tighten each of the seat straps by grabbing both web ends on one side and pulling.

Pumping up the kayak

Now, top off the kayak by filling each side and floor chambers to 2.5 PSI. If using a pressure gauge, please note that the pressure will only read while you are pumping (needle drops up and down), since most gauges work on back pressure. It took us another 15-16 strokes to fill each side.

We moved on to the floor and put in another 22 strokes to reach 2.5 PSI. As we put in the last pump, we heard a sharp hissing sound, which sounded very much like a pressure relief valve – but there was not one in sight, and nothing mentioned in the instructions! A quick phone call, and we found out – yes – the Sawtooth has a pressure relief valve integrated into the floor chamber which releases at 2.5 PSI, under the floor covering, and rear of the floor Summit II valve. This is a “safety net” to ensure one doesn’t over inflate the floor and pop an i-beam, or have the floor expand in the hot sun.

Finish off by screwing on the valve caps to protect the plungers from sand and salt, or from accidentally being pressed.

While it is not mentioned in the instruction manual, now is the time to install the fin if you will be doing deep-water paddling; for shallow water, this can be left off, but it won’t track as well.

Installing the tracking fin.

Flip the kayak over and layout the fin, making sure the fin is pointing towards the rear of the kayak. Remove the retaining pin from the hole, by pinching the slotted side.

Installing the tracking fin.

Then push the front of the fin down into the slot and pull back – there is a lip that will catch the front of the fin. If you pull back far enough, the hole in the fin railing will line up with the hole in the fin. This was our only issue – we could not get the hole to line up, and thus could not get the retaining pin back in position. This was solved by using a small rock to gently tap the fin back into position until the holes lined up, and the pin slid through. As a precaution, pull up on the fin to ensure it is truly attached.

Easy to carry

You’re done! The Sawtooth is remarkably easy and fast to set up – less than 10 minutes.

Packing Up the Sawtooth Inflatable Kayak

Deflation is just as easy. Remove the tracking fin and “unweave” the seat straps to remove the seats. Then simply push down and lock the Summit II valves (military) to the open position and the air will swoosh out. You can then fold in each side to the center, then in half (into fourths), and then fold up to a “square” or roll up. To deflate the seats, use the back of the seat tube dust cover to “push open” the valve. It’s helpful to obtain a cinch strap to fasten the perimeter of the kayak body and seats together, and keep it from unrolling. As a side note, while you can press out most of the air, to really minimize the size/footprint, it is best to pump out the final air, using the deflate mode on your pump. Turn the valves to the inflate position so air doesn’t creep back in, and replace the wing-nut caps.

Aire Tributary Sawtooth Kayak Features and Specifications

Rugged hull easily dries

The Aire Tributary Sawtooth is constructed with a 500 denier PVC upper, and a 1000 denier PVC hull.

Interior vinyl bladder.

Two-way zippered compartments run the length of the sides, floor and seat backs, housing replaceable 10-mil vinyl bladders.

Zipper locks.

There are five “zipper locks” ensuring that the compartments do not accidentally open. The seams connecting the hull to upper are welded.

Summit II valve.

There are three 2.5-PSI inflation chambers utilizing Summit II military valves (both sides and floor).

Molded, adjustable carrying handle

Two carry handles can be found at the bow and the stern. Each of these consist of a molded rubber handle with webbing straps and buckles; the handles can be lengthened or shortened roughly 2-6 inches by tightening or loosening the webbing, or the handle can be removed completely. Adjustments can be made for hand size/gloves, or total removal for better comfort across the shoulders if portaging.

Series of cloth loops

There are twelve sets of 3.5-inch long cloth loops on each side – these are used to attach/readjust the seating positions, or for attaching gear. The loops are positioned approximately 12, 23, 33, 44, 54.5, 65, 76, 86.5, 97.5, 108, 118 and 129 inches from the interior snout, with the last set positioned 12 inches from the interior rear point.

Sculpted hull with removable tracking fin.

The underside features sculpted i-beam tubes and a removable tracking fin measuring 9 inches tall and 6.5 inches wide at the base.

Flip loop on underside

There are two cloth “flip handles” mid-center on the underside; these can be used to right the kayak if flipped in the water, but can also serve as quasi-carrying handles.

Mesh-covered bailing ports

The Sawtooth is considered to be “self-bailing.” Four mesh “screens” (two fore and two aft, one on each side) cover openings, allowing any splashed-in water to fall into the side wells and seep out. Conversely, water may seep back in if the kayak is heavily loaded. The mesh screens ensure that no debris enters into the kayak from below.

Oral-matic valve

There are two inflatable-backed “pillow” seats with oral-matic  valves, which can be inflated to 2 PSI. The seat backs measure 20 inches wide by 10 inches high and about 7 inches thick fully inflated (this can be adjusted). These have four attachment straps. In conjunction with the 12 sets of cloth loops, the Sawtooth offers virtually infinite seating arrangements. The seat back base is tapered, making it easier to relocate.

We did measurement tests. The exterior measures 13 ft 1.5 inches – close enough to the published 13′ 3″ – and is 33 inches wide, with a 9″ rise both bow and stern. The interior dimensions are 141 inches “point to point” and 15 inches at the widest point. The tubes are 9 inches in diameter and – with the humped floor – creates a seating well roughly 6-8 inches deep.

Aire Tributary Sawtooth Inflatable Kayak.

With the seats set up for tandem paddling as previously outlined (front seat on the 4th & 7th loops, rear seat on the 8th and 11th loops) there is 33 inches behind the rear seat back, 13 inches wide and tapering to a point. There is 36 inches between the two seats, and 57″ from the front seat back to the interior snout. All this can be repositioned based on the paddler sizes.

Set up for solo paddling

We set the Sawtooth up for solo paddling, with the seat attached to the 5th and 8th loops. This setup provides 64 inches behind the seat-back to the interior stern and 69 inches from seat-front to interior bow point – plenty of room for gear!

Suggest payload is 400 lbs. The Sawtooth has a one year warranty.

Aire Tributary Sawtooth Inflatable Kayak On the Water

We tested out the Sawtooth over a couple of days.

Aire Tributary Sawtooth kayak paddled tandem.

First, my husband and I took it out together for a short jaunt in pretty calm water.  After eyeing the locations, I moved the front seat to the 3rd and 6th loops, to give him enough leg-room. First impressions – the Sawtooth is a wonderful kayak. It’s speedy, tracks and paddles well, and is fairly maneuverable for its size. It also feels rugged. The lower side walls – in conjunction with the 2.5 PSI chambers (which provide rigidity) – make it easy to get in and out. The front/rear handles make carrying the kayak a cinch, while the 35 lb. kayak weight with seats is quite “carry-able.”

At 5’4″, I was fairly comfortable in the front while my 6’2″ husband had plenty of space behind. He was able to use my seat back as a foot brace, while my feet were pressed into the nose – in the future I would opt for moving the seats back a loop.

As the Sawtooth is constructed with mesh-covered self-bailing ports, my husband quickly noticed some water coming back in through the ports, while I had none in the front. A subsequent discussion with Aire and NRS provided some better understanding. The weight capacity of 400 lbs is based on a 2-inch waterline of evenly distributed weight, with a recommended maximum level of 1/3 the tube submerged. As most of the kayaks we carry are not self-bailing (or have removable plugs) we realized that it is probably best to even out the load by putting the heavier person in the front position (over the widest part of the kayak). This would remove some of the weight over the mesh ports, lessening water entry. This will also lessen the amount of water that can get into the zippered compartments. (AirKayaks note: I did notice water was trapped inside the zipper despite the locks, but it easily poured out when the kayak was turned upside-down to drain.)

Aire Tributary Sawtooth kayak paddled solo.

I then took the kayak out solo, with the seat hooked to the 5th and 8th loops. One thing to note is that this is a long kayak, with no foot pegs. Following a suggestion, I disconnected the back straps of the front seat, flipped it over towards the nose and used it for a foot brace – it worked perfectly (thanks Josh!).

Aire Tributary Sawtooth kayak paddled solo.

As a solo kayak, the Sawtooth also handles beautifully. It feels great, paddles well and is slightly more maneuverable. The sides were low enough (and kayak narrow enough) that I didn’t experience “knuckle rub.” With my weight in the center, I did not notice any water getting back in.

saw28

And despite the humped center, it is actually stable enough to stand up – though I wouldn’t make a point of it.

I then took the Sawtooth out solo on a windy day with chop. The Sawtooth rode over the waves pretty well, though I did struggle with the wind and certain cross waves. Some water crashed over the sides, but the self-bailing ports drained pretty quickly. To be sure, if you plan on kayaking in rough weather, dress accordingly.

There are no side handles, so to carry it solo one must hook it over the shoulder, or attempt using one of the flip straps on the underside. There are also no paddle holders, so a leash might be in order.

Backside of the pillow seat.

My only slight criticism is with the pillow seats. While the thickness/rigidity of the bladder can be varied by removing/adding air, the low-height does not provide the best back support. I did grab an AquaGlide core fishing-ready seat that was sitting nearby, and this worked well, also providing storage compartments (as well as fishing rod holders) close at hand.

Aire Tributary Sawtooth Inflatable Kayak Bottom Line:

The Aire Tributary Sawtooth inflatable kayak is a winner – a great option for those interested in calm water paddling that either need a tandem or a solo kayak that can hold lots of gear – or both. It’s easy to set up, paddles and tracks well and is very speedy.

Aire Tributary Sawtooth kayak paddled tandem.

As a tandem, it is roomy enough for two average-sized adults to paddle comfortably, yet still offers storage space behind the rear seat. The cloth loops systems – in conjunction with the adjustable seat straps – allows for quite a bit of flexibility in the seating positions as well as for attaching gear. While the ability to inflate the seat back provides varying levels of comfort and support, I would suggest looking into an upgrade if you plan on paddling for any length of time – such as the AquaGlide core seat.

Parents wanting a lightweight and simple paddling option will find this is a great choice for enjoying the water with a child. The material is rugged enough that I wouldn’t hesitate to bring along my canine buddy.

Aire Tributary Sawtooth kayak paddled solo.

As a solo option, the Sawtooth also shines; there is plenty of room for a wide range of paddler heights as well as room for extended camping gear. The 12 sets of cloth loops provide ample attachment options.

While the Sawtooth does not come with a carrying case, by purchasing a simple cinch strap one can easily keep the bundle together.

Easily fits in a car trunk.

The 35-lb weight and folded/rolled-up footprint make the Sawtooth a great choice for RVs, plane travel and those limited by space. It can be stored in the trunk of a car for spur-of-the-minute activity. Set up is simple and takes less than 10 minutes. The smooth, water-resistant material provides for easier cleaning and drying though the zippers can trap in water.

Aire Tributary Sawtooth kayak paddled solo.

The open cockpit design makes entry and exit a boon to seniors or those with physical limitations. The Aire Tributary Sawtooth is best-suited for paddling calm waters, mild swells and slow moving rivers through Class II. MSRP is $749.

For more information or to purchase, see the Aire Tributary Sawtooth product page on AirKayaks.com, or view the other Aire Tributary inflatable kayaks. Stay tuned for more product write-ups on the Aire Tributary kayaks, in particular the Strike 1, coming soon.

Posted by: airkayaks | January 11, 2017

Innova’s New 2017 Inflatable Kayak and Canoe Lineup

The year 2016 brought some major changes to the US-based Innova kayak product line, when the company and assets were acquired by Gumotex, Innova’s parent company.

New Innova Seawave inflatable kayak for 1-2+ paddlers.

For decades, Gumotex has been known in Europe as a manufacturer of high-quality inflatable kayaks and canoes that can be inflated to 3-PSI, making them more rigid for better performance. With the transfer of assets, Gumotex committed to bringing more models into the US in conjunction with a fresh look to the Innova product line.

Innova Twist I LN in the new lite nitrilon material

The first step in 2016 included updates to the Innova Twist and Swing inflatable kayaks. The Twist and Swing models are now constructed from Light Nitrilon (LN), a lighter-weight version of the rugged material used in the traditional Innova Sunny, Helios and Safari models. Light Nitrilon is known for making the kayaks more rigid as well as water and abrasion resistant, without substantially increasing weight. It’s also PVC-free, thus environmentally friendly. Additionally, the Twist line was redesigned with removable, adjustable seating.

Swing Inflatable Kayaks now in green or red.

For 2017, more design changes, color choices, lower prices and new models are in transit, including new options for 1-2+ paddlers. The popular Swing I/II and Twist I/II will be available in green and grey as well as the traditional black and red. The Swing EX has been redesigned with Light Nitrilon construction, but remains in the one green color. The Swings now also come with a soft, carrying sack similar to the Twists.

Two “new” models – Seawave and Alfonso – have been available in Europe, but will now enter the US/Canada market.

Innova Seawave touring inflatable kayak for 1-2+ paddlers.The Innova Seawave is a 14’9″ touring kayak  for 1-2+ paddlers with the option to attach single and double decks for protection from the elements, as well as adding a third seat. At a mere 29 lbs, the Seawave is super-lightweight with a 31″ beam and constructed from Nitrilon. MSRP $999.

Alfonso inflatable fishing boat

The Innova Alfonso is an inflatable fishing boat for up to three persons, also constructed from Nitrilon. At 14’1″ and a wide beam of 49″, the Alfonso weighs 75 lbs with plenty of room for gear. A built-in transom allows one to use a small motor. MSRP $1599.

Three other models sport a redesign – the Solar, Safari and Vagabond.

Innova Solar 410C in red

Similar in styling to the original Sunny, the new Innova Solar 410C is a 13’5″ recreational kayak for 1-2+ paddlers – with the ability to add an optional third seat. Constructed from Nitrylon, the 37 lb kayak has a weight capacity of 595 lbs. It’s a great choice for calm waters, rivers and bays. The Solar 410C comes in a choice of red or green colors. MSRP $749.

Innova Safari 330 boasts a longer waterline.

The updated Safari 330C is now 8 inches longer (10’8″) with a wider 31 inch beam. The Safari features self-bailing ports and comes with a carrying pack and thigh straps – perfect for whitewater. The price on the new Safari 330C has been reduced from $899 to $699.

Innova Vagabond inflatable canoe for 1-2+ paddlers.

The Innova Vagabond 1-3 person inflatable canoe has been redesigned with a sportier look. At 12’5″ with a 38″ width, the updated Vagabond weighs 38 lbs with a weight capacity of 528 lbs. Foam-covered plywood seats allow one to paddle sitting or kneeling, with the ability to carry lots of gear or add an optional third seat. The price is lower for 2017, now reduced from $1199 to $899.

Innova Halibut inflatable kayak for anglers

With the organizational changes came some additional lower prices on some of the standard models for 2017. The Twist 1 and Twist 2 LN decreased from $449 and $549 respectively, to $399 and $519.  The Innova Halibut fishing kayak dropped from $1499 to $1199.

Three popular models – the Innova Sunny and both Helios I and Helios II – are being retired. All remaining inventory now feature reduced prices of $699, 749 and $849, respectively.

For more info or to purchase, visit the Innova product pages at www.AirKayaks.com.

Older Posts »

Categories

%d bloggers like this: